An Update on Endever Publishing Studios

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It’s been almost a year since Endever Publishing was born. And what a year it’s been.

We have a full house of authors we’ve signed on to publish their books with us in multiple genres from young readers to teen fiction to speculative fiction to horror/thrillers.

Last year we published our first two books and we’re gearing up to publish our third with a tentative release date of March 30.

I am proud to say that in a year, through all the unexpected twists and turns, we are remaining true to our core values of publishing innovative works by aspiring authors. Our books continue their legacy of featuring a short story by another in-house author, and we are tightening up our methodology of producing books through collaboration.

I’m proud to announce that we will be launching a website, a home-base, in March, which we are working very hard on. Our hope is that it proves to be enlightening, entertaining, and informative for both authors and readers alike.

In case you haven’t heard about us yet, here are the two books we have published:

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Both are available on Amazon (links below). A Deathly Compromise is available in both ebook and paperback version. These Great Affects will be available in paperback soon, but it’s ready for those of you who prefer ebooks.

So keep a lookout for more Endever news as we continue to plow forward into a great and exciting new year full of endless potential and possibilities that stretch into forever.

Check out A Deathly Compromise

and These Great Affects

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Why Stories Matter

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As we grow older we lose interest in stories and prefer cold, hard facts. To a degree facts are necessary.

But it’s when we lose sight of the importance of Story that it becomes an issue.

To lose interest in stories is to lose touch with humanity. Let me explain.

Stories, whether they’re true or not, are used as one of the most powerful tools to extract emotion. And emotion is what drives not only ideas, but movement.

Fishermen are driven to catch larger fish because they’ve heard of others who have caught large fish. They heard a story.

Humanitarians are moved to go across seas to feed and care for orphans because they saw a video of starving kids. They saw a story.

My kids go to sleep because we read them stories.

Stories, since the beginning of time (think papyrus and cave drawings) have aided in informing us, teaching us, moving us, and challenging us. Stories are the gears that churn ideas into movement.

Now, to be clear, not every story is a necessity. If we’re honest, we could have done without Dumb and Dumber, as hilarious as that movie is, but it doesn’t really do much to enhance our lives.

But think about how stories can be helpful. Think of the stories that have helped you in your own life. A few come to mind for me both in movie and book form:

The Bottom of the 33rd by Dan Barry is a literary example of how the right person can take possibly the world’s dullest subject and make it invigorating, exciting, and entertaining. This is one of my all time favorite books.

Cinderella Man is a movie that demonstrates that even in the face of something as harrowing as the Great Depression, we can overcome many things by using our natural-born talents and a butt-load of tenacity.

Toy Story proves that being the first doesn’t mean it has to be experimental. This movie broke new ground and still lives on today as one of the greatest movies ever made (if you’re not counting the sequels).

Did these stories change my life? I wouldn’t say that exactly, but they did help shape the way I think and view myself and the world. Therefore, I persevere, I fight, I explore, and I strive for greatness. Every time.

What are some stories that have shaped you and your life? Share below how you think Story can be an effective tool to better the world we live in.

If You’re a Writer, You’re Probably Making This Mistake

Rewriting. As writers we tend to get hung up on getting it right the first time, simply put. In fact, if you’re rewriting your opening chapter for the tenth time in the last three months, you need to do something: Go to the nearest ice cream store and treat yourself.

Seriously, get the biggest chocolate Sundae you can and gorge.

When you’re done with it, ask yourself, “Do I want another?”

As much as you loved it, you probably don’t want to subject yourself to an even bigger stomachache.

It’s the same thing with rewriting the first part of your book. Why go back and write it over and over? You’re going to get so sick of it that you’ll lose focus and before you know it, a year’s gone by and you’re lucky to be halfway done with your novel.

Write it all out from point A to point Z first (or point A to L to B to Y to 3 to Q, however you write). Because you’re going to do something to the book halfway through that’s going to require some changes be made to the beginning anyway.

And at that point you’ll really be pissed because you would have spent all that time polishing your opening up to perfection.

Don’t worry about getting it right until it’s done. 

Then and only then can you stand back and look at your project as a whole and determine where the changes need to be made.

Also, by rewriting the same thing repetitively, you’re not learning and growing. And without learning and growing, there’s no room or chance for improvement. Instead, you’re the Griswolds in European Vacation circling around the roundabout. You’re essentially just moving words around.

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My wife stopped reading one of my manuscripts years ago because she said, “I can’t remember which version is which.”

It’s imperative that you write something to completion so that you can experience and learn about the writing process as a whole. What good is mastering the opening if the rest of your book sucks? You’ve got to train yourself and put yourself through the dreary middle and perfect the ending.

You’ve got to learn to pace the action, keep the pages turning, and learn how to find the answers when you’ve written yourself into a corner. Circling the roundabout, you’ll never discover new streets or actually get anywhere.

Write that book to completion. Take it all the way through, even if your opening is weak. The trick is, having confidence that it’s not so weak that it’s a hopeless cause.

And by God, that is a trick! So good luck with that one! Just kidding, I’ll address that later.

Release Dates and Cover Reveals Soon!

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We’ve been busy at Endever Publishing Studios, and I’m proud to announce that we have not one, but two books that will be released before Halloween. We’re working out the release date details, and the covers for these two books are coming along swimmingly!

The first book is written by yours truly. It’s a young adult novel about a girl who falls in love with a boy…after he dies. These Great Affects is a heartbreaking story about love cut short and how one brave adolescent overcomes her pain.

The next book is written by Coral Rivera. Her debut novel, A Deathly Compromise, is about a sassy, music-loving Angel of Death who frequents a hospital in Oregon, just waiting to guide the next victims into the after life…

I can’t give the release dates yet, but I can assure you these two books will be out just in time for Halloween.

Can’t wait to share more with you as we have lots of fun promo opportunities planned leading up to the releases! I’d also suggest following Endever on Twitter to be kept most up-to-date! (@EndeverPubStuds)

Which book are you looking forward to the most? #TheseGreatAffects or #ADeathlyCompromise ?

 

A Little About “The Underneath”

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Endever Studios just released the third installment of the serial novel, “The Underneath.”

Take a moment to meet the characters who suddenly find themselves in an increasingly changing world.

All over the globe there is a disturbing siren that blasts through the air. It lasts for half an hour and ends with an earth-jolting shake, felt by everyone, everywhere. Suddenly the sun does not shine in places where the skies are clear, rain doesn’t fall from impregnated rain clouds. The wind ceases to blow, the temperature drops drastically.

Kyle Logan is newly divorced and trying to adjust to the single life. He loses his suit and tie, moves out of town, and buys a ranch house. A new start. But it’s difficult to start over when his ex-wife Stacey drops by for a visit. Some ghosts are hard to run from.

Dr. Edwin Remy: A young, accomplished professor who recently lost his tenure due to his escalating schizophrenic condition. In his hallucinations, he sees Ollie, his former research partner, who taunts him about his knowledge, his (possible) past history with this otherworldly encounter, and makes Edwin question everything he knows, including himself.

Cameron Agee acts as a surrogate father to his sixteen-year-old sister leaving him no time to party or live the normal life of a high school senior. When all hell breaks lose, he is unable to find her in the school mob as the students make a rush for their homes.

Desi Moreno: A teenage, Hispanic boy – neighbor to Edwin Remy – who helps takes care of his mother and sister. He is a talented painter, often skipping school to sell his pieces to support his family. Once the encounter occurs, he starts receiving visions (often harmful to himself) while he paints that foresee upcoming events. These visions, in turn, threaten to expose the person he has been hiding within himself for years.
“The Underneath” is a serial novel of suspense and mystery of epic proportions. Enjoy the third installment here!

Addressing My Own Stubbornness

Great conversation and comments on yesterday’s post! Thank you for all who contributed. I’ve read through most of your reasons for being stubborn by not walking away from the written word and indulging fully in the technology age, and I’ve got to say, many of you are much deeper and intellectually-minded than I am.

I thought through my own reasons for not being willing to put down my books, and here’s what I came up with:

  1. I am a control freak. My poor family has to deal with this on a regular basis. I know I’m not trying hard enough to break the habit, but I’m trying to try hard enough. Anyway, when I’m reading a book I get to control the pace of the story. Rent a movie and you’re slapped with the 142 min. run time. No more, no less, unless of course you skip the credits (GASP!). If I want a scene to unfold slowly, then I can choose to take my time processing the information before me. If a scene is boring, I can read fast. If a scene is suspenseful . . . (A huge shout-out to Sarah Angleton from The Practical Historian for nailing this one)
  2. THE SUSPENSE! I am absolutely obsessed with being in suspense. It’s like a weird non-sexual dominatrix thing I’ve got going on. Everyone loves a good cliffhanger, and that’s the exact reason I love books more than movies and TV shows:

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In movies, the suspense is revealed according to the director’s timing. You can’t hold out a little longer if he/she decides to reveal the outcome of a suspenseful situation.

TV shows are just too painful. They leave you with a cliffhanger and then you’re stuck scratching an irritating itch for a whole week or even several months. (This is why I love discovering shows really late because then I can Netflix them. Then the problem becomes not knowing when to stop. I’ve got to reach the next cliffhanger, I’ve got to know what happens, I’ve got to reach the next cliffhanger, what happens, cliffhanger, answers! It’s an endless cycle.)

So those are my two reasons why I refuse to let go of my books. I’m a suspense junkie. Speaking of suspense, you should check out the serial novel, “The Underneath” that my publishing company’s authors are writing.

Thanks for contributing to the conversation and may your weekend be filled with words, intimacy with your characters, and suspense!

The Burden of Creativity

space-exploration-43327We creative types have a difficult job. Essentially, our job is to create something out of nothing. Our job is to be original. To stand out. And eventually, to not only find fulfillment in our creation but fulfill others with it.

For most creative-types, we strive to guide our audiences through an emotional journey. . .

I take that back.

We strive to control our audience’s emotions. Through our creations.

And the fact is, we cannot live without creativity. Creativity turns the wheels of the world.

The reason people go insane in jail cells or on deserted islands? Many will say it’s because of a lack of community and communication. That’s true to a point, but I’d like to add a third option to create a holy trinity of functionality: There is also a lack of creativity being given and received.

When we’re not creating, or thinking organically, or processing, we go stir-crazy. When we’re not being stimulated by other people’s creativity, we get bored, we lose interest in things, we lose focus of life in general.

After all, a single life is a creative force in process, is it not?

So back to us creative-types. We are more than just wayward wanderers, or left-filed players. We are shape-shifters, world-changers, earth-spinners.

 

We are the inventors of existence in that we create something out of nothing. We storytellers guide and influence people’s thoughts, actions, and decisions. We decide what is relevant and important.

But being born centuries late into a creative world, we are faced with a problem. We’re torn between exposing ourselves to creativity for inspiration and shielding ourselves for fear of the temptation to mimic.

As serious storytellers, we are charged with the task to explore uncharted territories. We don’t have the luxury of recreating a school for wizards, a son-hunting fish, clashing superheros with differing powers.

I see serious storytellers as space explorers, forced to venture further than anyone has gone before. The storytellers before us have claimed the nearest stars, those stories have been told and many have been well received. But now we must go further, push ourselves deeper into the darkness and uncertainty of space. It can be scary because what if we waste too much time on an idea, or a star, that’s going to burn out?

That’s the risk we take. But we’ll never know unless we test it. And if we let one story go untested, that just may be one less the story the world, or a life, can be influenced by.