AVAILABLE NOW!!

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THIS NEVER HAPPENED, a book by R. Tim Morris, is the peculiar story of Cepik Small (known as “Epic”) and his journey to find a sense of belonging in his world. Epic is unique in that he suffers from a cognitive disorder known as prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize and remember faces, which only adds to his feelings of disconnectedness.

Just as Epic begins seeing a new and unorthodox therapist, he also meets the bold and blithe Abigail Ayr. Then there are the questionable changes to his prescription meds, the ramblings of his dying father, his immersion into a virtual reality game, and the ghostly shadows he begins seeing everywhere. And when a novel found on the subway begins to strangely mirror events in Epic’s own life, his mysteries quickly and uncontrollably begin to unravel. Winding through a patchwork of allusions and clues, readers will slowly piece the truth together as Epic does, while simultaneously considering the possibility that our protagonist might actually be losing his grip on what’s real and what’s not.

Buy it on Amazon here!

Podcasts: What Do You Get Out of Them?

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Podcasts. Something that’s relatively new on the social media market, yet they’ve been hidden underneath some digital rocks for a while.

Do you listen to them? If so, share below which ones you like the most and what you get out of them.

As a visionary I like to keep on top of what’s trending and if all of my blog followers are listening to podcasts, I’d like to tune in. So share your favorites down below, even if it’s your own!

Don’t have a favorite podcast? Then what sort of podcast would you like? Suppose you found a podcast on writing, what would keep you listening to it? What sorts of nuggets of wisdom would you hope to find?

 

Why Stories Matter

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As we grow older we lose interest in stories and prefer cold, hard facts. To a degree facts are necessary.

But it’s when we lose sight of the importance of Story that it becomes an issue.

To lose interest in stories is to lose touch with humanity. Let me explain.

Stories, whether they’re true or not, are used as one of the most powerful tools to extract emotion. And emotion is what drives not only ideas, but movement.

Fishermen are driven to catch larger fish because they’ve heard of others who have caught large fish. They heard a story.

Humanitarians are moved to go across seas to feed and care for orphans because they saw a video of starving kids. They saw a story.

My kids go to sleep because we read them stories.

Stories, since the beginning of time (think papyrus and cave drawings) have aided in informing us, teaching us, moving us, and challenging us. Stories are the gears that churn ideas into movement.

Now, to be clear, not every story is a necessity. If we’re honest, we could have done without Dumb and Dumber, as hilarious as that movie is, but it doesn’t really do much to enhance our lives.

But think about how stories can be helpful. Think of the stories that have helped you in your own life. A few come to mind for me both in movie and book form:

The Bottom of the 33rd by Dan Barry is a literary example of how the right person can take possibly the world’s dullest subject and make it invigorating, exciting, and entertaining. This is one of my all time favorite books.

Cinderella Man is a movie that demonstrates that even in the face of something as harrowing as the Great Depression, we can overcome many things by using our natural-born talents and a butt-load of tenacity.

Toy Story proves that being the first doesn’t mean it has to be experimental. This movie broke new ground and still lives on today as one of the greatest movies ever made (if you’re not counting the sequels).

Did these stories change my life? I wouldn’t say that exactly, but they did help shape the way I think and view myself and the world. Therefore, I persevere, I fight, I explore, and I strive for greatness. Every time.

What are some stories that have shaped you and your life? Share below how you think Story can be an effective tool to better the world we live in.

Poll: How Can We Please You?

As you know my publishing company Endever has just released two books in ebook form. One, a teen romance novel about a girl who falls in love with a guy after he dies. (You can check it out here.) The other, a mainstream novel about the Angel of Death, named Dee, who’s got an attitude and a playlist to match, always on the lookout for the next victim of an accident or crime to take into the great beyond. (You can check that one out here.)

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They’re both up on Amazon. I want to thank each of you who has bought our books and hope that you will write an review of them and pass them along to your friends and family. But to those who have not purchased your own copies, I’d like to politely ask why. I’m not mad. I’m just curious.

As the owner of Endever, I sincerely want to know what will catch your attention. What will it take to get your support, for you to purchase our books? I’ve created a poll for you to participate in if you would like to provide feedback.

I provide feedback to my employers all the time and they kind of get annoyed by me. I’m not that employer. I genuinely want to know how to grab your attention. So if you have not purchased our books from Amazon yet, please tell me below, either utilizing the poll tool or via a comment in the comments section.

How My View of the Horror Genre Has Changed

517n7y7xjulI used to be adamantly against anything that fell into the horror genre. Unless it was something by M. Night Shyamalan. Because M. Night movies are to horror shunners as Will Smith’s albums are to white guys who don’t listen to rap.

Then I started watching The Walking Dead. And obviously, like everyone else in the Western world, I was hooked.

I always thought the gratuitous blood and gore would get in the way of the storytelling, and sometimes it does a little bit, but the show proved to me that horror can work as mainstream. Why? Because, to quote Adelle Hitchens from my teen book, These Great Affects, “It’s the blood and guts with a little bit of heart.”

It’s those lovable, admiral characters  that draws me in.

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I just finished reading the monster of all monster books, It. It’s the first Stephen King book I didn’t hate (well, I liked Under the Dome, too). I had no idea it was so widely received.

Everywhere I walk I have a book in my hand, especially at work. While everyone is hunched over their cell phones, I’m hunched over my latest book in the elevator.

This is the only book I’ve read where I was consistently stopped and told how good the book I’m reading is.  (It was awkward when I was reading the weird and unnecessary scene with the kids in the sewer in the dark and someone says, “What part are you at?” … “Um…the kids are playing?”)

paavpdqsbtggtmn4smxsBut other than that, the book was spectacular, and I almost even teared up in a couple of spots. The book had violence and creepy stuff, but the heart and soul of the story was the love these seven protagonists shared with each other. I’m just really hyped up about the remake now!

Even before my  evolving love of horror set in (actually, it’s still a reluctant like to tell the truth), I always loved the darker movies. I love Pixar because their movies are generally darker than their competitors.

The darker the story is, the brighter and more exultant the ultimate victory is at the end. The harder the battle, the darker the foe, the more loss that’s suffered, only makes the survivors that much stronger, which serves as a more triumphant, feel-good ending.

Our world is so dark and gloomy anyway, and it’s rare we see evil defeated. I think that’s maybe some of the subconscious point of the horror genre. To shed a little light on a dark and disturbing world, and the satisfaction we feel when evil is trumped (no political pun intended…seriously.)

So please! Share your favorite horror stories that you’d like recommend to me.

First Article About Endever Publishing

28751_10151294434995480_1557171638_nA week or so ago I was interviewed by a local reporter about my publishing company. I thought I’d share the article with you to give you a little more insight into who we are and what we’re about.

Please note, the article states that our first book, These Great Affects, came out on October 20, but that release date was pushed back to November 10. A Deathly Compromise is still scheduled to be released this Thursday on October 27.

The article is below.

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New Louisville-based publishing company, Endever, to launch first two books in October

 

A Necessary Delay

Hello. As you partially know, our family has been under a lot this last year especially concerning the last few weeks with our foster son being in the ICU. His condition is stable and he’s waking up.

Tomorrow was supposed to be our big release date for Endever’s first book, These Great Affects. But with all the unexpected delays on the home front, I am forced to delay the book’s release.

As a business owner, I refuse to rush any of our products. That would be a disservice to you as our readers and to those who embody the company, since we want to put out squeaky-clean products, and books that we will be proud of ten, twenty years down the road.

Because by then, no one will remember the book was delayed.

In other news, Endever’s “second” book, A Deathly Compromise, Coral Rivera, is still on schedule to be released on October 27th, just in time for Halloween. This is the story about Dee, a sexy, sassy, music-loving embodiment of Death who roams the halls of a Portland hospital, waiting to spirit away the souls of the dead.

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This book is the first in a series that I am extremely excited about, and as a publisher and reader, I cannot be more proud of this book and the author, and I am excited to reveal it to the world. No matter what your fiction preference is, you will not want to miss this one.

Thank you for your understanding and continued support.