An Update on Endever Publishing Studios

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It’s been almost a year since Endever Publishing was born. And what a year it’s been.

We have a full house of authors we’ve signed on to publish their books with us in multiple genres from young readers to teen fiction to speculative fiction to horror/thrillers.

Last year we published our first two books and we’re gearing up to publish our third with a tentative release date of March 30.

I am proud to say that in a year, through all the unexpected twists and turns, we are remaining true to our core values of publishing innovative works by aspiring authors. Our books continue their legacy of featuring a short story by another in-house author, and we are tightening up our methodology of producing books through collaboration.

I’m proud to announce that we will be launching a website, a home-base, in March, which we are working very hard on. Our hope is that it proves to be enlightening, entertaining, and informative for both authors and readers alike.

In case you haven’t heard about us yet, here are the two books we have published:

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Both are available on Amazon (links below). A Deathly Compromise is available in both ebook and paperback version. These Great Affects will be available in paperback soon, but it’s ready for those of you who prefer ebooks.

So keep a lookout for more Endever news as we continue to plow forward into a great and exciting new year full of endless potential and possibilities that stretch into forever.

Check out A Deathly Compromise

and These Great Affects

Take Cover

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On August 1st, the world will change.

Millions will die.

The unlucky survivors will be forced to live in a darker world.

The sun will still be there, but it will not shine. There will be rainclouds, but no rain.

The grass will die. Trees will wither. Crops will rot.

And scattered throughout the world will be people hanging onto what little life they have left.

Endever Publishing Studios is proud to present a serial novel that will debut on August 1st, 2016. Keep checking back here for more details.

And don’t forget to take cover…

Climbing Up the Corporate Christmas Tree

keep_calm_and_climb_a_tree_round_ceramic_decoration-rfb33ecaa15d7445c81cf0e26aeaa3fcf_x7s2y_8byvr_324You’ve likely worked for bosses or managers who just don’t understand. I’m not talking about the inability to sympathize. I’m talking about a literal inability to understand the job they hired you to do because they haven’t done it themselves.

Mostly that’s due to someone inheriting their position through a variety of different means.

There are very few situations where I find this acceptable. Let me explain why.

My wife and I have differing Christmas tree styles we prefer in our living room each year. She thinks the bigger and fuller the tree the better. I prefer the smaller ones because there’s less mess and less decorating. She likes it to be chuck-full and overflowing with white lights and ornaments that date back to 30+ years. With her style, you have to wonder if there’s a tree anywhere underneath the decorations. As far me, bring out a strand of those big, bulky colored lights recycled from the 90’s, wrap them around once, plug ’em in, and wash the sap off your hands before you pour yourself some egg nog.

Everyone has different Christmas tree styles.

So let’s say companies are like Christmas trees. Someone who starts at the bottom and works their way up to the top is going to have a pretty good idea about what kind of Christmas tree they’re on. They’ll figure out that the red globes go on every third branch, the faded framed family portraits are hidden toward the back of the tree, and the higher up they climb they’ll find the ornaments becoming a little more fragile to remain out of reach of kids and dogs.

But someone who’s just thrown in at the top is not going to have as clear of an idea as to what kind of tree he or she is working with, because we’re all fixated on the star at the top. People don’t look down from the branch they’re on. We all only look up.

Bosses and managers need experience and an intimate knowledge of the company they’re managing. If you’re the manager or director of a call center and you’ve never been put through the fire of call after call of angry customers, you have no business managing people that go through it day after day.

If you’ve never struggled as a middle-class working American, I wish you’d think twice before running for president. Because how can you have a clear understanding of the plight of the common American people?

You see, as you climb the tree, you’re collecting broken ornaments, finding burnt lightbulbs, and noting bare branches. You’re building up a knowledge base of issues within the company that need to be resolved in order for synergy to exist.

My father owns a framing company out in California. Even though he owns the company, I’ve always admired that he himself can pick up a hammer and put in a day’s worth of hard work under the blistering sun.

It’s for this exact reason that as I build my publishing company from the ground up, I am putting myself through the fire. I have two manuscripts written that I’ve submitted to my partner Lynn. Through the editing structure we’re building, I’ve had to revise one and put the other on the back burner to be completely redone.Endever Arch

That way, when I come to one of our authors and point out problems in their manuscript, I can sincerely say, “I understand how frustrating this is … but trust me, it’s going to be a better book in the end.”

There are a myriad of reasons why it’s important for owners and managers to climb up the Christmas tree from the ground up. And to be honest, if Endever succeeds, I’m not going to just hang out at the top becoming best buds with the angel and hibernate in the safety of my secluded office. I’ll keep writing and pushing myself.

That way, if the style of the tree changes from white lights to colored lights, I’ll be ready to get my hands dirty and pitch in. After all, it’s my company, right? A guy should take pride in his possessions.

Writers: Cut Out the Middle Man!

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London – Buckingham Palace guard

I came across this article by Chuck Sambuchino, “The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents.”

With all due respect to all of the contributors of the article, I must call a time out.

Since when did these agents’ opinions become the standard by which books are written? Who set them up to be the gods of the publishing industry who grants and denies access into one of the most coveted industries in the creative arts? And who, among you struggling writers, is still bowing down to these agents’ decrees?

Think about it. Hollywood, though far from perfect, produces a large handful of blockbuster hits a year. Though it’s not as often as we might prefer, but time after time audiences are introduced to breakout directors, actors, and other big screen talents.

Why, then, have we only been given one J.K. Rowling in the last twenty years? One Suzanne Collins? And yet, James Patterson (whose name is bigger than his skill) is still raking in millions.

Literary-Agents-Today-WEBIt’s these gatekeepers, these literary agents, who are locking the gates to the rest of you. You hang on their every word and piece of advice because they’ve convinced you that it’s by their opinions alone your writing career lives or dies.

In the article above, Cricket Freeman from The August Agency demands writers to not kill the main character off in the first chapter. Yet, I’m reading Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, where that very thing occurs, and I’m loving it. One of the main character’s death at the end of chapter one propelled me to keep reading.

Laurie McLean from Forward Literary tells writers, “Damn the prologue, full speed ahead.”

Sometimes prologues are necessary. Especially to people whose tastes fall into slower-paced books.

Read the the tips and advice from these agents in the article and for almost each one you’ll find your favorite books break their exact rules.

Writers, it’s time to stop feeding the beast! If you’re a struggling author, you’ve no doubt spent countless hours trying to appease these self-proclaimed gatekeepers only to be rejected again and again and again – with no reason provided whatsoever!

Have you ever considered that their job is to deny your manuscripts, to keep the slush piles from reaching the desk of an actual publisher?

Think I’m crazy? Imagine if Brad Bird had written a query letter to a literary agent:

My book idea is about a sewer rat who dreams of being a cook in one of the finest restaurants in 1e20db52948b7d5b340921e8aa2e6126France. He’s a dirty, filthy vermin who convinces a garbage boy to act as his doppelgänger to cook the restaurant’s greatest dishes.

He’d be rejected five times to the moon and back and probably blocked from a majority of their emails.

I can go on, but I hope you get my point. That’s why you must cut out the middle man, because (with minuscule exceptions) a literary agent DOES NOT and WILL NOT take a chance on you! Why? Because you’re not James Patterson or his cousin. You don’t have a million and a half followers on you blog. You’re a nobody and literary agents couldn’t care less if you have the best idea in the world. They’re looking at names and reputations and resumes.

They’re not looking for ideas because ideas are risks. 

That’s why at Endever Publishing Studios, we put emphasis on ideas. We don’t leave you waiting for seven, eight, or nine weeks before getting back to you concerning your submission (while requesting you don’t query any other agents or publishers). We don’t look for perfection, because we know that it takes time and work to turn any idea into something wonderful and beautiful and, dare I say it, successful.

After all, that’s what we all really want in the end, right? Success?

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Think twice before sending out your eightieth or one-hundred-eightieth query letter to a literary agent. Don’t take their word as the gospel truth. If you feel like readers don’t see enough breakout authors in the industry, think about whose fault that is. Think about all the amazing books and stories we’re missing out on because these agents gave themselves the power to deem what readers should and should not read.

Take a look at my company’s submission guidelines and see if we might be a good fit for you. Yes, I realize our acceptance and denials are subjective as well, but we pride ourselves on our ability to limit that subjectiveness by looking at all submissions with an open mind.

We don’t ask ourselves what we like to read. Instead, we ask ourselves, could this idea contribute positively to the book industry? And if so, let’s make it better!

What I’m Learning So Far As a Business Owner

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The most common emotion I have as a brand new business owner is uncertainty. The next two emotions are fear and optimism. Somehow they go hand-in-hand.

I’m beginning to think it’s going to be a long while before I know what I’m really doing. Until then I must be content flying by the seat of my pants, believing in my ideas and my team, and play the role of the good news prophet.

There’s a difference between being a prophet who bears good news and a manager who wants to their ears to be tickled. We’ve all worked for bosses who only want to hear the good news. To me, that’s problem avoidance. One of the first things I told my partners when I selected them was that I want to hear the bad news. It’s my job as the founder and owner of Endever Publishing Studios to figure our how to clean up the mess. And if I can’t come up with a solution, then I ask for help. I wouldn’t have invited my teammates to be apart of Endever if I couldn’t rely on them for help.

After all, I’m just a business owner. I’m not perfect.

So what do I mean by being a good news prophet? While fear an optimism go hand-in-hand, I must not let my fear show. It’s imperative that I keep that part inside and display my optimism as much as I can. I must forecast good news so that my team and my writers will continue to believe in Endever.

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Does that mean I make stuff up just to lead them over a cliff?

Absolutely not! I’m busy working and reworking my business foundations until I feel I get something right. Pioneering a new publishing company means plotting out a succinct process for our book productions, routing book sales to benefit all parties involved and help the company grow, deciding what roles are most needed and what jobs those roles will consist of, and so on.

That’s where I’m at now as of the writing of this post. That way, when I get all the wheels greased and spinning in the right direction, I can forecast good news. I can be sure of myself because I will have sought out advise from key people, and in the end I will believe that I’ve made the right decisions for Endever and everyone involved.

That’s handling and cleaning up problems and prophesying good news. That’s freeing my teammates to do what I’ve instructed them to do within their area of expertise. And to me, that’s creating a safe and healthy environment for authors and other key players to join in the future.

I’ve got a long way to go, but like hopscotch, I’m doing my best to land straight in all the right spots.

Writers, Here’s How to Submit Your Manuscript

Hello writers. It was brought to my attention recently that I failed to put the link to my publishing company’s site so you can submit your manuscripts for us to consider for publication. I’m sorry about that.

Here’s what you do:

Go to Endever Blog

Go to the link at the top that says, “How to Submit.”

And follow the instructions.

All we really require at first is just a quick 2-3 sentence pitch as though you caught us in the elevator. Throw us your idea to endeverpublishing@gmail.com. If we like what we hear, we’ll ask you to submit a 4-5 minute video of you describing your work to us, along with a “back cover” written description of your book.

Happy submitting!

Authors, Send in Your Submissions!

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My publishing studio has just opened up for more submissions.

Check out Endever’s blog and peruse through the new menu options at the top. There, you’ll find an expansion on our mission and method, updated personal bios on me and my colleague Lynn, detailed information on how to submit, and a snippet of of our upcoming projects.

We know how it is to submit endless amounts of queries to agents and search ruthlessly for publishers in hopes that they’ll even look at your submission. Endever Publishing Studios, LLC is a safe and reliable publishing home for authors.

We’re currently looking books in any genre. If you have submitted to us before and we rejected your proposal, please know that you are always free to resubmit different ideas.

Normally we accept manuscript ideas and even partial manuscripts, and we still do. But we want to put an emphasis on any manuscript that is completed, even if it’s just a first draft since we have room in our circulation right now.

Maybe you’re not a writer, but everyone knows one. So share this post on your social media sites and get your writer friends to submit so we can consider taking a chance on them.

Have an awesome Friday, and remember, just because it’s the weekend doesn’t mean you quit working – it’s the time to invest in life-enriching work.