The John Grisham Challenge: The Pelican Brief


I’ve just finished the third book in the John Grisham lineup as part of my #JohnGrishamChallenge, and holy crap, what a wild ride!

The Pelican Brief is one of those books where I (brace yourself for the cliche) literally “couldn’t put it down!” It’s a cat-and-mouse chase through and through, and the victims of the murders catch you off guard every single time.

I said there’s murders, but the book’s not scary by any stretch of the imagination. Heck, it’s hardly even a law book. It’s just about a fresh law student who happens to pin the target in an extracurricular brief she drafts up about the mystery murders of two Supreme Court Justices.

At this point through his books, I can safely say that Grisham’s books are gaining more and more momentum and are getting more and more hard to put down.

Have you read it? Share your thoughts below or go to #JohnGrishamChallenge to submit your Grisham book reviews.

Big Announcement This Thursday!


Be sure to check in this Thursday, October 15th for the biggest announcement of my writing career thus far! You’ll also understand why I haven’t been posting much on here. Anyone care to venture a guess?

Catch This Book as Soon as You Can

Catch-Me-If-You-CanOne of my favorite movies of all time is Catch Me If You CanIt doesn’t really fit in a genre – it’s action-packed, funny, emotional, intense… the genre I put it in is called Fun. Just plain old fun.

And… it was a book first, written by our very own Frank Abagnale, Jr. Or Frank Connors, or Frank Williams, or Robert Conrad, or Robert Monjo. Take your pick, it’s all the same crook-turned-FBI specialist.

And though the book is vastly different than the movie, I like them both just the same.

I recently read the book for the second time and was just as captivated and held to the edge of my seat as before. And honestly, the whole thing is hard to believe.

One of the major differences from the movie is that there is no Carl Hanratty hot on Abagnale’s trail – how could there be? It’s an autobiography. But even without him, the book is just as fun, because you know the FBI is never really that far behind.

Pick up the book as soon as you can. It reads as fast as the main character runs. I’ll be rereading it again and again down the line.

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The Grisham Challenge, Book 2: The Firm

403coverI read John Grisham’s The Firm back in high school for class. For an assigned book, I remember being pretty impressed. But as a high schooler, I didn’t allow myself to fully accept how awesome an assigned book could be.

Having just read it again as an adult as part of the Grisham Challenge, I’ve got to say that this book is now considered one of my desert island books. Couldn’t. Stop. Reading. It.

No wonder John Grisham gained such a heavy and substantial following with the release of this book. Even if all the circumstances in the book aren’t completely believable, it’s sure one heck of a fun read!

Imagine getting your dream job, and not only that, but they pay you out the nose, with virtually unlimited vacation time – paid in full – money for a down payment on a house, a company car, the works. That’s the sort of job our protagonist signs up for. But unfortunately he comes to realize that it really was all too good to be true and nothing – absolutely nothing – is as good as it seems.

There’s very little violence in this book – maybe a page worth, but the drama and suspense runs at virtually a 10 from page one. Grab ahold of this Grisham thriller and dazzle yourself.

Ranking the Dystopian Teen Novels

First off, thank you all so much for the warm congratulations for adopting our daughter. Sarabeth and I were very warmed by your support and enthusiasm.

Part of Katherine’s name is based off of Katniss from The Hunger Games (just look at her initials). Some people might mock us for our obsessiveness over a teen book (pun intended), but Katniss is the kind of girl we want Katherine to be inspired by as she grows older. She’s strong, compassionate, uncompromising in her beliefs, and fiercely loyal. Plus, Katherine already has a dog named Prim, so it works out.

Yeah, I admit, I read teen novels. But I’m also in the book business, so it’s part of my job to be well-versed in what the hottest thing out there is (I’ll still pass on 50 Shades of Grey, thank you very much). While biographies, history, sports, and some mainstream fiction are part of my circulation, I get a sense of thrill when I’m about to start a new teen book, mainly because the competition out there is so fierce and only the best survive. Believe it or not, the odds are not in every book’s favor, especially in the future day setting.

Here’s four dystopian teen novels that I’ve read and ranked them from best to worst with explanations.


1. The Hunger Games

Full of depth, originality, and deep characters, The Hunger Games presents a believable future where upper-class citizens revel in the annual deaths of teenagers broadcasted on TV. These books challenge readers to stand up and challenge what’s wrong in this world and to fight for what is good and pure. They are read on a regular basis in our home.


2. The Last Survivors

Despite the political agenda behind Susan Beth Pfeffer’s series, it’s an extremely different take on the post-American world. The world has not shifted due to evil empires or wars, but by natural causes. An astroid knocks the moon closer to the earth, causing volcanoes to erupt, countries to flood, and the earth to shake, among other major disasters. Written from the diary of a young girl who is just an observer, the books are very believable and a fresh breath away from the tired action/thrillers populating the bookshelves.


3. Divergent 

Firs off, way too much romance. Way too much kissing and oohing and awing. Nothing can slow a book down faster than the old “we stole glances from each other, then it lead to kisses” garbage (in my opinion, anyway). The concept is good, but a bit confusing as I could never remember what each faction’s purpose was. To be honest, I didn’t even bother to read the next two books, because by the end of the first one, I just didn’t really care.


4. The Testing

I’m sorry, but shame on HMH Books for publishing this series. Is it Divergent? Is it Hunger Games? To be fair, the reviews on Amazon are exceptional and the first book received 4.5 stars out of 5. That’s impressive. But personally, I can’t remember being so bored with a book. It’s a total hybrid of its dystopian counterparts. And completely predictable. I also don’t plan on bothering with the next two in the series.

True, the competition among teen books is fierce. I just hope that other, better books, aren’t being buried in the commotion of the dystopian hoopla which are just riding on the coattails of greater, braver books.

Have you read these? Which ones are your favorites?

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The Grisham Challenge Book 1: A Time to Kill


Wow! John Grisham starts his writing career off with a wallop, and a hard act to follow. Racism, threats, juicy courtroom drama, murder, revenge, and controversy.

As solid and enthralling as this work of fiction is, it wasn’t the book that launched Grisham into his superstar status, believe it or not. That doesn’t happen until the release of his next book, The Firm (which I’ll start reading shortly).

But let’s talk about the controversy in A Time to Kill.

A little girl gets raped. No… your little girl gets raped. You have a weapon and a clear shot of  the rapists. What do you do?

Now you’re in the jury box. The man being convicted was just exacting revenge on behalf of his battered and bruised daughter.

Do you convict him?

I know the law states that we are not to seek vigilante justice on our own, that we must leave it to the court to execute justice. It seems plain and simple, really. The man killed. The conviction of a guilty verdict should be implemented.

But Grisham’s brilliancy is that he blurs the lines between black and white (and I mean that both morally and ethnically).

This would be one of those very few scenarios where the movie had just a tiny edge up on the book. It’s been years since I’ve seen the movie, but from what I remember, Mathew McConaughey’s portrayal of our defense attorney Jake Brigance, in his closing argument, describes the heinous rape to an all-white, Southern jury. And then at the very end he says something like, “Now, imagine that the victim is white.”

That sort of happens in the book, except it’s a jury member who pulls that gut-wrenching punch.

If I were in the jury box, I might have very well given the verdict to the vindictive father and let him walk free. What about you? How did A Time to Kill affect you?

I know a few of you have expressed joining me in The Grisham Challenge. Join the fun and let’s read the works of America’s favorite storyteller together!

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The John Grisham Challenge


If you were to ask me who my favorite fiction writer is, by default I would have to say John Grisham, probably because I’ve read more of his books than any other fiction author. That’s not to say others don’t live up.

Suzanne Collins hasn’t written as many books, even though I’ve read all eight (actually, nine) of her works.

Jeff Smith is a graphic novelist, so he can’t count as a fiction author.

And Stephen King just wasn’t the right fit for me.

Plus, I love courtroom action, and I think Grisham does it best.

But somewhere in the middle of his writing career, he kind of lost his touch. Sure, most of us can agree that his books set outside the courthouse are left wanting a little more substance (or plot), but the most recent trial books I’ve read by him haven’t necessarily lived up to par, either. I remember loving one of them immensely (The Broker, maybe?), but the ending was so sudden and unsatisfying that I ended up hating it.

So I want to find out what went wrong. At what point did America’s favorite storyteller lose his knack for captivating his john-grishamreaders? (Or hasn’t he?) You see, I want to avoid whatever mistakes he made, and capitalize on his strengths (and there are many), because I may or may not be writing my own courtroom book currently. And in order to do it well, I want to learn from the best.

I’ll be reading them in order of release from A Time to Kill, which I’m almost done with, to Rogue Lawyer. 

Some of them I’m very excited about revisiting, like The Firm, The Client, The Testament, and others not so much, like A Painted House and Playing for Pizza.

But we can’t expect a perfect 100 from someone’s who’s given us almost forty titles. So, Mr. Grisham, here’s to the next couple of years spent together in thrilling courtroom (and sometimes sports, rural, and Christmas) bliss.

Share your favorite John Grisham novel below!

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