The Birth of Something Amazing

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February 3rd. This is a good day for so many reasons.

One being that today is Pixar’s 30th anniversary!! 

My partners at my publishing studio, Endever, decided last week on our first book production!

It’s going to be the YA novel I recently wrote about a girl who falls in love with a boy after he dies.

The decision was almost nerve-wracking as Endever Publishing Studios is not genre-specific – we’re story specific. (We don’t want people to assume we’re a YA publisher.)

So I gave my partners (also acting as editors, story developers, publishers, and so much more) the first chapter and they gave me the greatest compliment a writer should ask for:

They said, “I’m not feeling it. The main character’s whiney. And I don’t get her parents at all.” In essence, everyone was shallow and one-dimensional.

I’m actually not saying this is a compliment to be sarcastic. I mean it.

Writers have a tendency to surround themselves with Yes People. We tend to give our work out to those whom we know are going to throw flowers at our feet and laud us with compliments and climb mountains to praise our work before the heavens.

Joseph and Lynn, my partners, are not yes-people.

Endever is not a Yes publishing studio. We’re also not a No studio.

When we start accepting book submissions, we’re not going to send you a heartless rejection letter if we don’t love your story idea. We’ll send you tips, ways it can be improved, suggestions, tips. (More on this later.) Because we’ve been in that position – being rejected by publishers and agents time and time again.

It’s like that teacher you hated because all he or she did was hand out big fat F’s but never taught you how to fix your work or point out exactly what you were doing wrong.

And that’s just one way Endever is going to be more awesome than other publishing houses.

So February 3rd is amazing for a lot of reasons but especially because I’ll be busy rewriting that first chapter for my partners, who represent all of you – the readers. And soon, the first book production from Endever Publishing Studios will be born, and you will  cradle it in your hands and hopefully call it the best book you’ve read in years.

That will be Endever’s goal for every book.

Have you submitted your short story for our writing contest yet? Why not? You can win $150. Give it a shot. Click here for the rules and guidelines and the link to submit. (Deadline is February 25)

Follow Endever on Facebook and Twitter to watch us grow!

Any questions, email us at endeverpublishing@gmail.com or ask below.

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About Andrew Toy
I'm in the beginning stages of starting my own publishing company that's unlike anything you've ever heard of in the industry. The direction of AdoptingJames is taking a 90-degree turn and will be more writing/publishing-focused. Stay tuned for huge updates and exciting news!

17 Responses to The Birth of Something Amazing

  1. Lonz says:

    Truth at the hreatest level. A writer needs the critique worth having m Food luck with the project.

  2. Congrats and best of luck to you! 🙂

  3. I wish you the best of success.

  4. Ocean Bream says:

    Sounds really really good. I actually am quite sold.

  5. mn6363 says:

    Good luck and I swear just from that one sentence description I HAVE to read this book!

  6. oldmurkyheart2 says:

    Good luck! Writing seems easy but is the toughest thing to do. Kudos to you

  7. J. R. Turner says:

    Gotta love the first round edit. Good luck with everything Andrew. I wish for you and your company’s success. 🙂

  8. The best feedback I’ve gotten so far was after my grandmother read a short story of mine. She said: “It has a lot of short sentences.” I’ve been cognizant of that as best I can ever since.

  9. Coral Rivera says:

    Congrats, and best of luck to you!

  10. Lonna Hill says:

    It is so hard for me to find friends who can really be helpful when reading my work….people who won’t hand it back and say, “I loved it. Good job!” It’s hard to get some people to understand that I don’t want confirmation, I want advice and that it’s okay to be critical…I can take it…I recognize that I have work to do but need to get to the mistakes I can’t see myself.

    I know it sounds strange, but when I ask someone for writing advice on a piece that I’m stuck on and that I know needs work, and I get it back with a “It’s great. Good job,” I feel naked and vulnerable and regretful that I ever shared it with them in the first place. I need the meat…concrete examples of what I’m doing well and why something isn’t working.

    I’ve been fortunate enough to have a very helpful critique group in the last two places I’ve lived, but having moved recently, I’m still working on putting a group together here.

    Have fun with your revision, and best of luck on your new publishing path.

    • Andrew Toy says:

      I understand the feeling of vulnerability after someone says, “Good job.” As artists, we almost WANT someone to point out the flaws in our work so that we can reach that next stage of perfection we’re trying to achieve.

  11. Good concept of how to write a helpful rejection letter instead of just a heartless one! Sounds great!

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