What Keeps Me Watching Toy Story

Even as a thirty-something year old, Toy Story remains one of my most absolute favorite movies of all time. And like each Pixar film, it’s riddled with tiny things that keep me coming back to it that most people might not really notice. Here are a few examples that I believe help make Toy Story great:

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-21221. Woody is just hilarious. When Buzz Lightyear is showing off his cool gadgets to the other toys, Woody’s impression of the space guns is just perfect. Sarcasm, jealousy, and frustration all rolled into one.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-8502. “We’re with you, Woody,” says Slinky, which prompts Mr. Potato Head to remove his lips and press them against his butt. I didn’t catch this until I was way older. One of the funniest gags in the franchise.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-82923. Okay, maybe the funniest gag is when Woody throws RV out of the moving truck and the toys freak out, because they already think he’s a murderer.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-30334. The lighting. I am absolutely dazzled by the use of lighting in pretty much this whole movie, but especially in the late afternoon just before Andy and his mom leave for Pizza Planet. It really does remind me of my own childhood as summer days were winding down and the sun was setting behind the hills leaving behind a red tint.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-1505. The opening credits. Even when I saw this in the theaters as an eleven year old, I noticed right away that Toy Story opened up unlike any other animated movie ever had: With on-screen credits during the action so there’s no wasted credit time and the movie moves forward from frame one. To this day I consider it one of the greatest movie openings of all time. It’s artsy, it’s simple, it’s telling, it’s to the point, and vastly charming and entertaining. And Randy Newman’s song just nails the mood. (It was also the first time I’d ever heard a song sung by a performer that wasn’t sung by the characters in an animated movie – I hadn’t seen The Rescuers yet.)

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-36236. Greatest threat line ever: “But we’re not on my planet, are we?”

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-2467. The spinning chair. When the chair spins and Woody is forced over onto Andy’s leg, that one-second shot tells you all you need to know, that Woody and Andy are inseparable, and there is no comfort in the world like belonging to Andy.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-40598. The Pizza Planet truck says “Yo.” Awesome attention to detail. Puts me right back in the ’90s.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-46459. Another great example of detail: Buzz glows in the dark. He’s got to be the only character I’ve ever seen in a film who does this.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-815110. Woody’s run. Woody is the only character I’ve ever seen who can make me literally LOL just by his wobbly, exaggerated run.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-236811. During Andy’s turning point, when his affections shift from cowboys to spacemen, there’s a scene where Andy disappears into the closet as a cowboy and emerges a second later as a spaceman. If you watch carefully, you can see the camera jolt just a tad, giving the impression that the filmmakers were attempting a popular camera trick, but the camera got bumped as though it were a real camera set up on a real stage.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-161312. Adding another sense of utter realism, the Davis’ house is bumped and bruised all across the floorboards and lower doors. There’s scratches in the chairs and wood peeling off the walls. It’s hard to remember you’re in a make-believe world.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-540613. Woody’s voice box waking up Scud is the greatest use of his pull string in the whole franchise. Sheer suspense!

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-7414. I think when we first see Woody, it’s the best character introduction ever, and I can’t explain it. It’s the way the camera is positioned, the perfect tilting of the cowboy doll suggesting that he’s a hero, but also just a plastic toy (but the perfect plastic toy), combined with the music makes is a moment I look forward to reaching every time I turn the movie on.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-869815. The match is blown out! The filmmakers didn’t need to add this scene. The movie would have worked just as well without it. But I’m glad it’s there because it seriously adds a whole layer of suspense and devastation. I love this addition so much that I wrote a post on it a while back. Check it out here.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-371416. The devastation in Woody’s voice and his face is so convincing when he realizes he’s a lost toy. I seriously feel for him each and every time. There’s no Hollywood sappiness here. This is real, raw emotion at his greatest nightmare coming true.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-125617. The Army Men. The whole Army Men sequence could quite possibly be my most favorite scene in the whole movie. It’s playfulness and ingenuity is addicting. Any boy who didn’t immediately start making Army Men movies with their cameras is not a true Toy Story fan.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-209718. The line, “The word I’m thinking of, I can’t say, because there’s preschool children around.”

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-668719. I love Jon Negroni’s theory that this hat proves that Jessie’s Emily could really be Andy’s mom.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-788220. Just like Walt Disney and his crew drew from the popular horror movies of their day as inspiration for Snow White, the Toy Story crew seemed to do the same thing. The kings of animation never intended for animated movies to be just for kids.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-387921. The argument Woody and Buzz have under the truck is a perfect example of two characters not willing to budge on their convictions. And it’s a wonderful sequence, because even though Woody is 100% right, he looses the argument because he can’t control his emotions as Buzz is able to. I think this is such a compelling scene because we’ve all been there (especially us married folk).

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-425222. Everything about Pizza Planet. As a kid (and even now), I’d give anything to go to a restaurant just like this. But it has to be Pizza Planet.

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-607223. Take a close look at this Battleship game between Hamm and Mr. Potato Head. I’d love to play Poker against that spud!

toy-story-disneyscreencaps.com-699424. Woody’s talk seriously makes me want to be a toy. Wait, I am a Toy! And my name’s Andy… Hmmm.

I agree with Walt’s nephew Roy E. Disney that there’s literally not a single frame in the entire movie that doesn’t push the story forward. There are certainly dozens of other things that make this film one of my favorites, but then it would be too long of a post. Share some of your favorite Toy Story moments below! And, thank you, DisneyScreenCaps.com for the images.

Disney Live-Action: Not As It Once Was

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Remember Meet the DeedlesSnow DogsMax Keeble’s Big Movie? Me neither, because I never saw them. These are all products of the debacle that was Disney live-action films of the early 2000s.

It seemed the company was just churning out whatever cheap film they could make to get the attention of persistent 8-year-olds to drag their parents to the latest family comedy.

The Disney studio had become what Walt Disney himself never intended: cheap entertainment that pandered to the lowest denominator of audiences.

(No offense if you happen to like any of those movies; I confess I’m quite partial to Heavyweights.)

But those days are long behind us.

Just like Disney’s animation division, their live-action films are giving the rest of Hollywood a run for their money, especially in the realm of their sub-genre – live-action remakes of old Disney animated classics.

It started with the odd, yet bewildering Alice in Wonderland in 2010. That was improved on with 2014’s Maleficent, a bit formulated, but more impressive than most people expected. Last year’s Cinderella confirmed that Disney has hit upon something great with this remake franchise by delighting us all. If you haven’t seen it, I highly recommend it.

And now the studio’s newest release, The Jungle Book, is taking the box office by storm. And well it should! I saw it the other day and was seriously blown away. It was like watching Peter Jackson’s King Kong all over again, only, dare I say it? I bit more dazzling.

Sure, it follows Disney’s original ’67 animated version, but the detours are delightful! It was hard to believe that these animals are completely CGI (be warned parents of young ones: this is not Babe – far, far from it). Nothing at all looks fake in this movie. As impressive as it was to look at, I’d say the most wonderful thing about it is that there’s literally not a single dull moment. I never checked my watch, I never even bothered to scratch the itch on my ankle for fear of missing something.

And you will never see Shere Kahn the same way again. This new version of him just may be the most fearsome villain in the whole Disney pantheon.

And the franchise, it looks like, has just begun. Disney has confirmed that they will be remaking many of our childhood favorites (Dumbo, Peter Pan, Aladdin, Pinocchio, etc.). And if they keep on doing whatever it is they’re doing right, I say bring it!

Have you seen The Jungle Book? Share your thoughts.

 

Endever and Contest Updates

Endever Twitter

Endever Update!

Things have been quiet on the social media front in our neck of the woods, but that doesn’t mean we haven’t been busy behind the scenes!

First off, if you’re still interested in submitting to our current writing contest, there’s still time! There were a lot of people who wanted to enter but were too late. We’ve extended the deadline for getting your submission in by May 25th. Click here for the rules. Or click here to simply submit.

In case you haven’t heard, as of March 24th, we are officially an LLC!! That wouldn’t have been possible (so quickly) if it hadn’t been for everyone that submitted to our first writing contest and participated in the voting. One of our goals is to be a debt-free company and so far we are able to keep moving on that path thanks to all of you supporting us.

Our next step is to obtain our ISBN which will separate us from other publishers when our books are out in the world.

To date, we are working on two separate manuscripts that are incredibly different from each other and have been a blast to work on. Keep an eye out for more info regarding our first two book publications!

We asked you all to pitch us your book ideas (whether complete manuscript or just pieces and parts) in 140 characters or less on Twitter, tagging us @endeverpubstuds. We have not responded to any yet, but will be having a conference call soon to move forward with follow-ups. Spread the word and keep on pitching. We are excited to add more manuscripts to the docket and work with you all😀

Question of the Day: What is your favorite writing resource(s)?

Comment below!

#HappyThursday

Disney Animation and Baseball

I think every parent wants their kids to show an interest in what they’re invested in. I’m no different.

With my kids being just 1 and 2 their minds are young enough to mold. Obviously, if they show an interest in licorice making or the study of different types of sand in Mid-eastern countries, then I will support them and show an interest in their passions. But until then, I want them to know what their father loves so maybe I can pass that love onto them.

5My first passion is Disney animation. In the next couple of years I will be watching a lot of Disney animated films from Snow White to Gigantic in order to study and analyze them. I’m even writing a book about the history and current success of the Disney Animation Studios, so my kids are going to be well-versed in Disney lore as I read aloud to them Walt Disney biographies and animation books.

Perhaps it will inspire one of them to be an animator. Or a screenwriter. Or a storyboard artist.

My other passion is baseball. I don’t watch it on TV or root for any particular team (if I had to pick, it’d be the Dodgers). In truth, I couldball never figure out the point or excitement in televised sports when you have the ability to actually play them or go to the stadium. Instead, I’m talking about playing baseball. I’m hoping to find a local baseball team to join this summer so my kids can watch their old man attempt to knock one out of the park. Or sprain his ankle trying to get past first base.

I’ve been taking the kids to the nearby park so they can chase the balls I hit and bring them back to me. I even bought them a T-ball stand, but they still think it’s fun to hit the stand and not the ball. I’m working with them.

But I hope to infuse the love of baseball in them because it’s one of America’s greatest pastimes and one of the elements that helped make America what it is today. The same goes for Disney animation.

They may not be interested in my passions, but really my goal is simple:

I want them to discover their passion while they’re young so that I can have time to encourage them to pursue it with all their might before they get out in the real world. Too many of us discover our passions too late and I don’t want that to be the case for my kids.

So for now, we’re starting with the basics: A few colorful movies and a baseball.

Don’t forget about our new writing contest that’s currently going on for a chance to win $200. The deadline for submissions is April 18th.

Now Accepting Manuscript Submissions

Open-for-business

I am proud to announce that Endever Publishing Studios is now a registered business with the state of Kentucky! So we are now officially

Endever Publishing Studios, LLC

That’s a nice sound. And it’s because of all of you who submitted your short stories for our writing contest last month. Thank you so much.

Don’t forget about our new writing contest that’s currently going on for a chance to win $200. The proceeds go to helping fund other early business expenses.

So we are officially a company. What now?

Now we are going to be on the lookout for book submissions. You writers are familiar with the process.If you’re not looking for an agent, then you’re reading through publishers’ submissions guidelines. (Submit full manuscript, include a cover letter, allow 6-8 weeks for a response if they decide to respond, etc.)

Endever’s submission process is much different.

At Endever, we want our books to sell based off of just a couple sentence synopsis. Almost like a movie tagline. That’s how you need to convince us your story is a good idea. Whether you have a completed manuscript or not, Tweet us at @EndeverPubStuds and pitch us your story idea.

We will be accepting pitch Tweets until April 1st. If we like your idea or want to hear more, we will contact you via Twitter and then ask you to send in a 3-5 minute video pitch of your idea.

If we still end up wanting to work with you, we will assess your manuscript and work with you on it. If you don’t have a manuscript written, we will work with you and guide you during the writing process as Endever holds to a collaborative writing structure.

So pitch away, as many as you’d like. Good luck! At this point, all genres are accepted except romance/erotica.

If you have any questions, please email us at Endeverpublishing@gmail.com

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Writing Contest: Your Favorite Fictional Couple

900Homer and Marge, Cinderella and Prince Charming, Ross and Rachel, Shrek and Fiona…

These are all iconic fictional couples whom we are familiar with. We adore them, we love them. But what happens aftertheir “Happily ever after?” Do they stay in love? Do they have an unfortunate fallout? Does conflict disrupt their lives? Perhaps the threat of a third world war challenges their devotion to one another?

You tell us!

For a chance to win $200, writers are encouraged to pick any iconic fictional couple made frozen-2popular by a book, movie, or TV show and enlighten us on what happens after their “Happily ever after.”

Are you not a writer? No problem! We’re sure you know plenty of writers in your life, so please pass this contest along to them so they have a chance at winning $200. Who knows, they might even take you out to dinner…

Contestants must be at least 13 years of age to enter. Do not exceed 1,000 words. New deadline is May 25th.

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CLICK HERE to submit

And please feel free to contact us at Endeverpublishing@gmail.com for any questions you may have or leave you comments in the section below.

That Match-Out Moment

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You know in Back to the Future, how every opportunity to return Marty to 1985 is thwarted until the last possible minute? Like, the Delorean not starting, and the chord getting unplugged, and the movie just keeps you on the edge of your seat and doesn’t let you go until you finally see those flaming tire marks lead into a bright blue flash.

And then, similarly, in Toy Story, when every hope of Woody and Buzz returning to Andy is completely dashed, with RV’s batteries running out and that ridiculous car putting out the flame on Woody’s match (I’ve always had a strong dislike for whoever’s driving that car). But that moment between the match going out and Woody using Buzz’s space helmet as a magnifier, as devastating as it is, is just so much fun! Right? Because, you know, that somehow everything just has to work out, but – how?

I’ve researched this particular kind of climactic moment that doesn’t seem to get used enough. I’ve asked people in the drama field what this particular arch in the story is called. And I’ve never gotten an answer.

If you watch the commentary for Monsters, University. (I cannot stress how important it is for every writer or story lover to watch these valuable features), you’ll hear them talking about this type of moment. When the door closes on Mike and Sulley, locking them in the human world, the commentators refer to this as a “Match out” moment – referring to Woody’s match going out.

That brilliant moment when all hope not only seems lost, but is lost.

The Delorean could have simply just worked. The match could have lit the fuse to Buzz’s rocket. Mike and Sulley could have just walked back through the door without Dean Hardscrabble unplugging it.

But that’s just too easy.

Authors, writers, don’t make it easy for your protagonists! Set every obstacle you can possibly think of between them and that happy ending we all know is coming. In fact – make it completely impossible for them to get there. And then find a way!

Go into overtime as a storyteller and work out how your protagonist can accomplish the impossible. Make it a “match out” moment.

If you’ve read The Man in the Boxyou’ll recognize several such moments in the third act. It fuels the story, gives it that extra umph, and most of all, it shows the reader that you care about their experience.

You care enough to go that extra mile, to push your character that much further, and to entertain your audience for just a few more moments before handing them that happy ending.

Writers, get good at that “match out” moment. It could be the moment a reader falls in love with your work.

And don’t forget to enter our writing contest for a chance to win $200!!

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