Why You Should be Glad When You Have No Reason to Be

photo-119We’ve been extremely fortunate in our foster-to-adopt situation with Baby A.

More fortunate than most people.

In a few weeks the State will change Baby A’s permanency goal from reunification with her birth parents to adoption.

We’re hoping Baby A will officially be a Toy by Christmas, which is feasible as long as there are no surprises.

We also just found ourselves in a situation where we are ready to take in another baby if the State calls us. So we’re looking forward to an addition to our family of five (two dogs) in the next couple of months.

Right now, things can’t seem to get much better, but we recognize that things could change in a heartbeat, so we live with that reminder and walk cautiously, yet graciously.

We owe our happiness to God, for He has graciously provided us with Baby A after years of praying, waiting, crying, and longing for her. The wait was worth it.

I was not a good Christian during that waiting period. I grew resentful toward God, and even hated Him for not giving us a child when I wanted. But looking back, I can see that the timing was absolutely perfect.

I just wish that while we were waiting for a child that I had acted better. I wish I had prayed more and taken the opportunity to grow in my relationship with God.

So, if you’re in a waiting period, or things are difficult, or you’re at your wit’s end, or life just seems to be falling apart around you, I can’t promise that it will get better, but the odds are definitely in your favor.

Just don’t wait for things to get better and then praise God for what He’s done, because then you’ll end up like me and feel like a hypocrite (or something… I haven’t quite figured it out yet), and you’ll feel a little out of place when you do thank God for the turnaround in your life circumstances.

So even in your mourning and your crying and your despair, God is to be praised, so that when things do look up for you, you can confidently point to Him and say, “It’s because of Him that this happened,” and not feel so out of place.

7 Rules That Can Make “Dumb and Dumber To” Great

dumb-and-dumber-2-poster-fullYou’ve probably seen the Dumb and Dumber To trailer by now, and like most intelligent and level-headed human beings, you’re probably looking forward to seeing the movie as much as I am. You’d be hard-pressed to find an individual who doesn’t laugh themselves silly at the 1994 ultimate comedy of comedies, Dumb and Dumber. 

But, just as with every other anticipated sequel, we all have our concerns that it won’t live up to its predecessor. I’ve put together a list of 7 rules the Farrelly brothers should follow if they want their sequel to measure up to their ingeniously-dumb and whacky magnum opus.

dumb-and-dumber 1

1. Little to no plot

The best recipe for a comedy is having very little to no plot. On the extremely rare occasion that I sit down for a comedy, I want to turn my brain off and watch well-written jokes – not follow a mediocre story. Just look at Napoleon Dynamite for a great example of how no plot can work wonders in a comedy’s favor.

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2. Lots of mindless tangents

Now, in order for anything to be filmed or written, there does have to be some sort of story. But, hopefully Dumb and Dumber To will keep it second priority like the original did, and not shy away from countless detours.

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3. Naivety with 21st century technology 

A lot has happened in twenty years, and it looks like one of the comic duo has squandered his time on a two-decade long prank being locked away from the outside world. Now, while I hope this movie doesn’t go all Blast From the Past on us, it would be nice to see what kind of dumbness can come out of Harry and Lloyd figuring out other people’s iPads and iPhones and Androids.

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4. Not being too crude

Part of the charm of the first movie was that it never really crossed the line into easy sexual innuendos or jokes. That’s a big part of what makes the movie a classic because it hardly falls prey to “easy” jokes. I’ll admit that the end of DDT’s trailer – the scene with the grandma – was a bit off-putting, but I did read somewhere that that’s the only awkward and cringe-worthy scene of the movie. But still, it’s the 21st century – our tolerance level has raised a bit, so we’ll see.

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5. Horrifyingly terrible acts done out of naivety 

Mary Sanson called the culprits who sold their dead bird to a blind kid “sick people.” Sick, yes. But also completely clueless, which is what makes Harry and Lloyd so much fun to watch.

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6. Overdoing adolescent boy fantasies

I think most boys have had dreams like Lloyd’s where he’s fighting off would-be perverts with no consequences and making nonsensical jokes at gatherings and being the life of the party for it. I think the sequel would do well to have another sequence like this one.

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7. Make no reference to 2003’s disaster, Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd 

Let’s just pretend that one didn’t happen. And if we can’t, then we’ll readily forgive the writers if they can pull this one off.

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8. Welcome rude and ignorant comments

“Don’t you go dyin’ on me,” seems to be a favorite line from DD. True, it’s mean and extremely ignorant, but remember – the fun is in the cluelessness. In the case of Dumb and Dumber, ignorance really is bliss. (Oh, and if the victims get their payback, that’s nice, too.)

How do you think Dumb and Dumber To can be just as good as the original? Share your thoughts below!

A Hero Has Died

WK-AV921_COVER__DV_20101110182743Louis Zamperini has died. He is the subject of the international bestseller Unbroken by Seabiscuit’s biographer Laura Hillenbrand.

The only reason I didn’t put this book on yesterday’s post, “Reading List for Patriots” was because I was saving it for when the movie comes out this December.

Louis Zamperini died of pneumonia yesterday in Los Angeles at the age of 97. And what a life he led. Unbroken details his life as a Olympic distance runner who so impressed Adolf Hitler that the Fuhrer insisted on meeting the young runner.

Later he enlisted in the United States Army Air Forces and earned a commission as a second lieutenant in the Pacific. He was shot down and survived 47 days at sea in a raft with two other men.

And that is only the beginning.

Unbroken is quite possibly the greatest World War II book (or nonfiction subject) I have ever read, and there is no better time for you to read it than now, in honor of a great American hero.

Unbroken will be Angelina Jolie’s third directorial project. Watch the three minute trailer here.

Unbroken

Reading List for Patriots

I’ve put together a few patriotic books that I have really enjoyed – so much so that I plan on returning to them for a second, third, or fourth read.

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John Adams by David McCullough

It’s my goal to read a biography on every U.S. president and John Adams not only depicts one of the best, moral, upright men who have presided over our country, but McCullough’s book is quite possibly one of the greatest, gripping, and engaging biographies I have ever read, and probably will ever read. You will frequently hear readers of the book lament coming to the end of the book, aching for more, long as the book is. It reads like a movie, and you will actually feel like John Adams is a true friend by the end.

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Close to Shore by Michael Capuzzo

Think small-town America off of a New Jersey coast. The year is 1916. Beaches were just recently seen as recreational turf for outings and vacations. The ocean was seen as a big, safe, swimming pool. And the great white shark was believed to be as harmless as a puppy. Close to Shore captures the first known recorded shark attacks on American soil, in an age where violence in the waters was unheard of. This story inspired Peter Benchley’s Jaws which gave us one of the greatest American films of all time by director Stephen Spielberg. But Close to Shore is so fascinating, so unimaginable, that it would not be believed if it were written as fiction.

1776

1776 by David McCullough

In McCullough’s detailed account of the monumental events in 1776, you have a much clearer and polished appreciation for the odds our forefathers were up against in the Revolutionary War. Not surprisingly, General Washington’s genius will blow your mind. And you will understand just how devastatingly close the Americans were to not winning our freedom. An intriguing, and sometimes suspenseful read. Another great by McCullough.

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Devil in the White City by Eric Larson

History and fiction buffs unite! There’s something about America’s past that makes me well up inside. This book recreates America’s prime, and the author never bores when describing the pure-white city “as bright as Heaven itself, and so majestic that the Court of Honor alone brought grown men to tears upon seeing it.” Suspense seekers and history buffs ought to check this book out. It’s a lot of fun and very fascinating. And you will walk away with a deeper appreciation of the roots of America’s greatness, and why we are still the greatest country in the world 120 years later.

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Bottom of the 33rd by Dan Barry

No other sport screams American pride like baseball, and in this book you will get a lot of both – baseball and American pride. Another book set in New Jersey, two triple-A teams pitted against each other on the day before Easter, April 18, 1981, neither knowing that they are about to go down in history as the longest professional baseball game ever. Even baseball naysayers will get caught up in the poet-like writing of Barry’s fascinating account. This is one of my all-time favorite books.

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Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination by Neal Gabler

Mr. Disney. Walt. One of my favorite men in history, who created the most beloved empire the world has ever known. Gabler’s meticulous account of Walt Disney’s life is eye-opening and truly fascinating, and is a true rags-to-riches story that will make anyone believe that if you are persistent enough, clever enough, and talented enough, you can make it anywhere in America.

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George Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow

And of course, no patriotic reading list would be complete without the life of George Washington, our nation’s first President. Earlier I praised McCullough’s John Adams as being the best biography ever written – this book is just a tick below, only because Washington, as a man, was not as personable and warm as Adams was. So no biographer in the world could create a personal attachment between the great Washington and his readers. But Chernow, I believe, did the greatest job that could ever be expected. Thought this is probably the longest book I have ever read, I will gladly be revisiting it as soon as I can, so fascinating it was.

Please feel free to share some of your favorite patriotic book recommendations below, we’d love to hear from you!

 

 

They Risked All

The-American-Patriots-Almanac-365-reasons-to-love-AmericaThe following is taken from The American Patriot’s Almanac by William J. Bennett and John T.E. Cribb.

On July 4, 1776, delegates to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia voted to adopt the Declaration of Independence. The men who issued that famous document realized they were signing their own death warrants, since the British would consider them traitors. Many suffered hardship during the Revolutionary War.

William Floyd of New York saw the British use his home for a barracks. His family fled to Connecticut, where they lived as refugees. After the war Floyd found his fields stripped and house damaged.

Richard Stockton of New Jersey was dragged from his from his bed, thrown into prison, and treated liked a common criminal. His home was looted and his fortune badly impaired. He was released in 1777, but his health was broken. He died a few years later.

At age sixty-three, John Hart, another New Jersey signer, hid in the woods during December 1776 while Hessian soldiers hunted him across the countryside. He died before the war’s end. The New Jersey Gazette reported that he “continued to the day he was seized with his last illness to discharge the duties of a faithful and upright patriot in the service of his country.”

Thomas Nelson, a Virginian, commanded militia and served as governor during the Revolution. He reportedly instructed artillerymen to fire at his own house in Yorktown when he heard the British were using it as a headquarters. Nelson used his personal credit to raise money for the Patriot cause. His sacrifices left him in financial distress, and he was unable to repair his Yorktown home after the war.

Thomas Heyward, Arthur Middleton, and Edward Rutledge, three South Carolina signers, served in their state’s militia and were captured when the British seized Charleston. They spent a year in a St. Augustine prison and, when released, found their estates plundered.

Such were the prices paid so we may celebrate freedom every Fourth of July.

Television’s Rape Epidemic – Post by Tim Challies

challies-thumb-800x533-335I found this to be a very interesting read concerning today’s mainstream media. Downton Abbey is a show listed in Tim Challies’s article that I have invested in, but I know many people invest their time in other shows he points out. Give it a read and share your thoughts. What do you think is the next frontier for explicit television viewing?

I don’t watch a lot of movies these days, largely because it’s rare that I can find something that promises to reward me more richly than spending the same amount of time in a good book. That said, I do enjoy the occasional miniseries when I can catch it on Netflix or iTunes; I guess I find it easier to part with forty minutes than two hours. Even with that limited exposure there’s something I have observed and something that has spelled the end of my interest in more than a few shows: Rape is in.

Click here to read the rest of the article.

You might also want to give one of my older posts a read and share your thoughts: Why Christians “Prefer” Violence to Sex. 

Summer Smoothies! (Guest Post from My Wife)

SmoothiesIt’s summertime and that means smoothies and fruit drinks! We love blending things at our house when it’s 90+ degrees out and our dinners are usually fresh salads with fancy dressings.

Anyway, my wife was kind enough to write a guest post for you all today about some of our favorite homemade smoothies. Feel free to share your own recipes below in the comments section so we can all have some new drinks to try this summer! Oh, and don’t forget to follow my wife’s awesome blog while you’re at it (you might find some more recipes from her later on): From Flats to Lofts.

I lived on Jamba Juice for about two months once. My wisdom teeth were coming in sideways,JambaLogo-PDFX-Prime-CMYK but I had to wait until I could take a week off of work to have them removed. (Plus I may have procrastinated going to the dentist for a couple of weeks after they started hurting because I’m a chicken.) It was cold, and didn’t require chewing, so it was the perfect lunch option – day after day after day…

But, then I didn’t eat for a week, and couldn’t drink out of a straw anyway, so I sort of stopped my daily trip to Jamba Juice. I was now $25 richer at the end of each work week. And really, once the pain went away I was pretty much grossed out by the thought of another smoothie. This lasted for several months, and when I finally wanted one again we were about to move from Seattle (Jamba Juice everywhere) to Louisville (Jamba Juice nowhere to be found).

So, I started to make my own. It is simple enough – just fruit and liquid. The two we make the most are blueberry and peanut butter.

 

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1 frozen banana (slice it before you freeze it)

1/2 cup frozen blueberries

1/2 milk

Blend ingredients together until smooth and enjoy!

 

Peanut butter:peanut butter

1 frozen banana (slice it before you freeze it)

½ – 1 cup chocolate soy milk

1 large scoop of peanut butter

Blend together – adding more banana or milk if needed until you get the consistency you want.

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