When Reconciliation is Not Sought

You may be in a position where you hate someone right now. Whether it be a trivial feud that escalated, or a situation where someone stabbed you in the back and you can’t seem to find a way to forgive and move on. Let’s all learn what anger can lead to from the best teacher alive today: history.

This is taken from The American Patriot’s Almanac by William J. Bennett and John T.E. Cribb

July 11, 1804, brought the most famous duel in American history and the fatal shooting of one of the nation’s founders.

The duel between Vice President Aaron Burr and former treasury secretary Alexander Hamilton was the result of a longstanding enmity. Politics and personal insults had driven the two men to detest each other. In 1804, when Burr ran for governor of New York, Hamilton attacked his character, denouncing him as an unprincipled adventurer. Burr lost the election and demanded satisfaction of Hamilton. In those times, that meant a duel.

Hamilton felt he could not refuse Burr’s challenge without appearing cowardly. It could not have been an easy decision: Hamilton’s eldest son, Phillip, had been killed in a duel. Hamilton apparently made up his mind to throw away his first shot at Burr, even if it meant death. He was resolved to “live innocent” rather than “die guilty” of shedding another man’s blood.

Early on July 11, the two men faced each other on a dueling ground at Weehawken, New Jersey. Hamilton fired into the air, missing Burr on purpose. Burr leveled his pistol and shot Hamilton in the abdomen, the bullet passing through his enemy’s liver and diaphragm.

Hamilton knew the wound was mortal. His friends ferried him over the Hudson River to New York City, where he died after thirty hours of pain. His death was widely mourned, even by political opponents. He was the only one of the Founding Fathers to die a violent death.

Burr was indicted for murder but not arrested. He fled New York, eventually returning to Washington, D.C., where he finished his term as vice president. The duel brought an end to his political career, and the shooting is still regarded as one of the saddest episodes in American political history.

“You have heard that it was said to the people long ago, ‘You shall not murder, and anyone who murders will be subject to judgment.’ But I tell you, anyone who is angry with a brother or sister will be subject to judgment.”

-Jesus, Matthew 5:21-22

[Image Credit]

About these ads

About adoptingjames
My lovely wife and I are foster parents, dog owners, home owners, and Christians. I am a blogger, book editor, and author. On my blog you'll read about adoption, faith topics, inspirational thoughts, and a whole lotta Disney/Pixar lovin'! For the most exciting read ever, check out my suspense/adventure novel, The Man in the Box. You. Will. Love it.

2 Responses to When Reconciliation is Not Sought

  1. Gail Raynor says:

    Biblical reconciliation is an area that is widely neglected by the church. We’d rather bury things under the sand and either pretend everything’s ok or completely ignore a brother or sister in Christ. We’ll never achieve the type of unity Jesus prayed for in John 17 if we don’t make reconciliation one of our top priorities in the Body.

  2. the Little Brown Tomato says:

    Great Word.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 13,325 other followers

%d bloggers like this: